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GLOSSARY
  • allergic (Massage Therapy)
    having a sensitivity to one or more normally harmless substances.
  • alpha waves (Massage Therapy)
    a type of brain wave generated when a person is relaxed, awake, and receiving no visual input.
  • Applied Kinesiology (Massage Therapy)
    Kinesiology is the study of the principles of mechanics and anatomy related to human body movement, specifically the action of individual muscles or groups of muscles that perform specific movements.
  • attunement (Massage Therapy)
    Attunement is a non-touch (or light touch) approach to healing, employing spiritual techniques (prayer and meditation) to restore one’s naturally vibrant energetic and physical well-being.
  • bindi (Massage Therapy)
    This bodywork combines marine algae exfoliation, herbal treatment, and light massage.
  • body alignment (Massage Therapy)
    Based on a balance between body, mind, and feeling, body imaging enhancement proposes that anatomical structural relationships of the body need to be realigned and stabilized from a central line of the body. This line posturally positions the body relationally to the force of gravity. As a result of the correction, the client will experience energy release and perceptible changes in body shape, flexibility, and movement. Working with the neuromuscular and myofascial systems, the therapist uses manual manipulations to stretch and release muscle tissue and fascia to create freedom and flexibility of movement.
  • breath focus (Massage Therapy)
    a form of mediation aimed at bringing on a state of relaxation.
  • breath therapy (Massage Therapy)
    Breath therapy, which can ease anxieties and reduce stress, is the use of respiratory exercises to open lung passages, oxygenate the blood, and cleanse the body by eliminating gaseous toxins. The client is encouraged to breathe deeply while the therapist works the appropriate muscles.
  • callus (Massage Therapy)
    hardened, thick skin that forms after repeated friction: often found on hands and the bottom of feet.
  • carpal tunnel syndrome (Massage Therapy)
    a condition that occurs when the median nerve, which runs from the forearm through the hand,is compressed: symptoms include pain, tingling, and numbness, as well as hand weakness.
  • chair massage (Massage Therapy)
    Known as seated massage, chair massage, or on-site massage, this technique involves the use of a specially designed massage chair in which the client sits comfortably. The modern chair massage was originally developed David Palmer, but the technique is centuries-old, with some Japanese block prints illustrating people having just emerged from a nearby bath, receiving massage while seated on a low stool.
  • Chair Massage (Massage Therapy)
    Chair Massage - Chair massage refers to massage given with the recipient seated in an ordinary or special massage chair. Recipients remain clothed in chair massage. It has been called on-site massage when the chair is taken to a public place such as an office or commercial establishment
  • Connective Tissue Massage (Massage Therapy)
    The technique consists of the massage therapist subtly hooking her fingers into the skin and superficial connective tissue while performing a dragging or pulling stroke that somewhat stretches the skin. CTM leaves a visible mark that looks somewhat like an abrasion or burn, but which goes away without leaving a scar.
  • Deep Connective Tissue Massage (Massage Therapy)
    Deep connective tissue massage uses slow strokes and intense pressure on connective tissue (the tissue that binds and strengthens the organs and other tissues, such as muscle). This relieves the patient of chronic tension and knots. Deep connective tissue massage can be slightly uncomfortable. More than one session may be necessary to cure chronic tension.
  • deep tissure massage (Massage Therapy)
    Techniques that utilize deep-tissue/deep-muscle massage are administered to affect the sub-layer of musculature and fascia. These techniques require advanced training and a thorough understanding of anatomy and physiology. The muscles must be relaxed in order to effectively perform deep-tissue massage, otherwise tight surface muscles prevent the practitioner from reaching deeper musculature.
  • elastin (Massage Therapy)
    a flexible, stretchy protein found in skin and connective tissue.
  • endorphins (Massage Therapy)
    substances in the body that reduce pain and create a feeling of well-being.
  • Five-Element Shiatsu (Massage Therapy)
    The five-element system views the human body as a microcosm of the universe with the tides of energy and emotions waxing and waning. These energies and emotions are stored in the visceral organs and move through specific pathways or meridians in the body in a regular and cyclical fashion.
  • foot zone therapy (Massage Therapy)
    Foot zone therapy is based on the premise that energy flows through the body in meridians from the brain to the feet. Every organ and cell has a representative point. On the foot, and when pressure is applied, the brain sends a signal to the corresponding part of the body to facilitate healing and restore balance. Temporary pain, defined also as a blockage of energy flow, is felt on areas of the foot that correspond to the affected organ or body part.
  • Gua Sha (Massage Therapy)
    A method of promoting blood circulation and removing toxic heat, blood, and lymph from the body, gua sha involves scraping the skin with a flat tool to facilitate pain relief. Olive oil and herbs are usually applied to the skin to open pores, increase deep cleansing, and improve circulation.
  • Holistic Medicine (Massage Therapy)
    Holistic medicine recognizes that the mind, spirit, lifestyle, environment, and other aspects of a person’s existence, significantly affect the functioning of the physical body. Thus, in evaluating and treating illness and prescribing preventative intervention, this approach treats the whole person, addressing more than just the symptoms or disease. Holistic practitioners may utilize a combination of conventional treatments along with alternative therapies.
  • Joint Mobilization (Massage Therapy)
    Joint mobilization focuses on muscles, ligaments, and joints that have inhibited range of motion. The osteopath manipulates the joints so that certain bone surfaces rub together. Afterward, the patient must learn strengthening and stretching exercises to prevent pain from returning.
  • Lymph Drainage Therapy (Massage Therapy)
    Lymph Drainage Therapy (LDT) is unique in that healthcare professionals learn how to palpate the lymphatic flow. As they develop their skills, they can then identify the rhythm, direction, and quality of the lymphatic flow. Advanced practitioners will be able to precisely map the lymphatic flow to find alternate pathways for drainage.
  • Manual Lymph Drainage (Massage Therapy)
    The strokes applied in manual lymph drainage are intended to stimulate the movement of the lymphatic fluids in order to assist the body in cleansing. This is a gentle, rhythmical technique that cleanses the connective tissue of inflammatory materials and toxins, enhances the activity of the immune system, reduces pain, and lowers the activity of the sympathetic nervous system.
  • Massage Therapy (Massage Therapy)
    Therapeutic massage, manipulating body tissue with the hands, heals muscles and promotes better circulation. It is effective for patients who suffer a range of conditions from arthritis to paralysis and is often used to relieve pain and reduce swelling.
  • Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy (Massage Therapy)
    The causal relationship between chronic pain and its source, myofascial trigger point therapy is used to relieve muscular pain and dysfunction through applied pressure to trigger points of referred pain and through stretching exercises. These points are defined as localized areas in which the muscle and connective tissue are highly sensitive to pain when compressed. Pressure on these points can send referred pain to other specific parts of the body.
  • Neuromuscular Therapy (Massage Therapy)
    A systematic approach to myofascial treatment that attempts to interrupt the neuromuscular feedback that maintains pain or dysfunction.
  • nodule (Massage Therapy)
    a small rounded bump or knot of tissue.
  • Prenatal/Pregnancy Massage (Massage Therapy)
    erformed by a trained perinatal specialist, many methods of massage and somatic therapies are both effective and safe prenatally and during labor and postpartum periods of women’s pregnancies. Prenatally, specific techniques can reduce pregnancy discomforts and concerns and enhance the physiological and emotional well-being of both mother and fetus. Skilled, appropriate touch facilitates labor, shortening labor times and easing pain and anxiety. In the postpartum period, specialized techniques rebalance structure, physiology, and emotions of the new mother and may help her to bond with and care for her infant. Specialized, advanced training in the anatomy, physiology, complications, precautions, and contraindications is highly recommended, and many practitioners require referrals from physicians prior to therapy.
  • Qigong (Massage Therapy)
    his traditional Chinese treatment combines hands-on and hands-off techniques that balance the flow of qi (energy) through the body, move and relieve qi blockages, and improve circulation. Qigong is also a combination of timed breathing and gentle flowing movement, meditation, visualization, and conscious intent all working together to achieve an integrated adjustment of mind and body in order to better cultivate, circulate, and balance qi, or life force. Qigong theory is the basis of traditional Chinese medicine and is used to treat many serious illnesses, as well as for relaxation.
  • Reflexology (Massage Therapy)
    Based on an ancient Chinese therapy, reflexology involves manipulation of specific reflex areas in the foot, hands, and ears that correspond to other parts of the body. Sometimes referred to as zone therapy, this bodywork involves application of pressure to these reflex zones to stimulate body organs and relieve areas of congestion. Similar to acupressure principles, reflexology works with the body’s energy flow to stimulate self-healing and maintain balance in physical function. This technique is used to reduce pain, increase relaxation, and stimulate circulation of blood and lymphatic fluids. It is especially useful in stress-related illness and emotional disorders. Reflexology is also convenient in cases where an area of the body is traumatized or diseased to the extent that direct manipulation is not appropriate.
  • Restless Leg Syndrome (Massage Therapy)
    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurologic movement disorder of the limbs that is often associated with a sleep complaint. Patients with RLS may report sensations, such as an almost irresistible urge to move the legs, that are not painful but are distinctly bothersome. RLS can lead to significant physical and emotional disability.
  • Scalp Massage (Massage Therapy)
    A scalp massage increases blood circulation and promotes healthy hair growth. It also promotes relaxation and can help relieve headaches.
  • Spinal Release (Massage Therapy)
    Spinal release allows therapists to correct distortions of the central nervous system and restore the body’s center of gravity. The therapist works with techniques that address the eight muscle groups of the lower back. Practitioners also focus on the soft-tissue release procedures for the neck and back as they help identify curvatures of the spine and other dysfunctions.
  • Sports Massage (Massage Therapy)
    ports massage is designed to enhance athletic performance and recovery. There are three contexts in which sports massage can be useful to an athlete: pre-event, post-event, and injury treatment. Pre-event massage is delivered at the performance site, usually with the athlete fully clothed. Fast-paced and stimulating, it helps to establish blood flow and to warm up muscles. During the massage, the athlete generally focuses on visualizing the upcoming event. Post-event massage is also delivered on site, through the clothes. The intent here is to calm the nervous system and begin the process of flushing toxins and waste products out of the body. Post-event massage can reduce recovery time, enabling an athlete to resume training much sooner than rest alone would allow. When an athlete sustains an injury, skillful massage therapy can often speed and improve the quality of healing.
  • Swedish Massage (Massage Therapy)
    Swedish massage is considered the most common form of massage and uses firm pressure to promote relaxation, relieve muscle aches, and improve circulation. The practitioner uses gliding strokes, tapping, kneading, and friction. Massage oil is often used.
  • Thai Massage (Massage Therapy)
    Thai massage is an ancient bodywork system designed to unblock trapped energy and improve vitality by applying pressure along energy pathways called sens. These pathways carry vital life energy. Thai massage uses slow, often meditative, rhythmic pressing by fingers, thumbs, hands, forearms, elbows and feet (which are used extensively) and yoga like stretches coupled with gentle rocking motions

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Version 1.0.2 (Morpheus-517) -- 30.November.2009