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GLOSSARY
  • acupuncture (Acupuncture)
    Acupuncture is an ancient oriental healing technique based on the Taoist philosophy of balancing energy meridians within the body, thus allowing the body to heal itself. Fine needles are painlessly inserted at key points corresponding to body organs to relieve pain and cure disease and dysfunction. Related techniques include the use of low voltage, electric current (electro acupuncture) or massage at key points (acupressure).
  • advance care directive (Acupuncture)
    A legal document that describes the kind of medical care a person want if an accident or illness leaves him or her unable to make or communicate decisions.
  • Ai Chi (Acupuncture)
    Ai chi is a water exercise and relaxation program, created by Jun Konno, to help aquatic practitioners and students enjoy the water in a flowing, yet powerful progression. Ai chi, created by combining t’ai chi concepts with shiatsu and Watsu techniques, is performed standing in shoulder-depth water using a combination of deep breathing and slow, broad movements of the arms, legs, and torso. The ai chi progression moves from simple breathing to upper extremity movement, to movement of the trunk, and finally to lower extremity movement. Ai chi promotes relaxation, stability, and coordinated breathing. It improves flexibility, mobility, and strength, and it will animate the mind as well as the body.
  • Amma (Acupuncture)
    Amma (sometimes spelled anma) is the traditional word for massage in the Japanese language. It comes from the Chinese tradition of massage, anmo. This form of bodywork is based on the principles of Chinese medicine and is more than five thousand years old.
  • balinese massage (Acupuncture)
    Positioned above the client, the Balinese massage therapist performs a combination of kneading strokes, skin rolling, and foot massage. Treatment is followed by an application of coconut oil infused with spices.
  • Cupping (Acupuncture)
    Cupping is an ancient Chinese practice that helps alleviate pain and soreness. A rounded glass cup is placed on the skin, and pressure is created within the cup. This pressure draws the skin and superficial muscle layers outward, easing acupuncture points deeper in the body.
  • Electroacupuncture (Acupuncture)
    Like regular acupuncture, electro-acupuncture uses needles inserted by hand. The difference is that in electro-acupuncture, these needles are connected to electrodes that provide electrical stimulation. Electro-acupuncture is considered quicker than traditional acupuncture, and has a stronger effect. It also allows the acupuncturist to more finely control the amount of stimulus given to a patient. People with cardiac problems should consult their physicians before using this treatment.
  • FengShui (Acupuncture)
    Feng shui (translated as “wind and water”) is the Chinese system of balancing the energy patterns of the physical environment. These principles strive for creating balanced, peaceful dwellings by bringing together the external and internal and living in harmony with natural and man-made environments. Good feng shui promises occupants health, happiness, prosperity, and long life--a conscious connection between the outside environment and the world within.
  • Five-Element Acupuncture (Acupuncture)
    Five-Element Acupuncture is an ancient form of acupuncture that treats the mind, body, heart, and spirit. The five elements are fire, earth, metal, water and wood, which correspond to emotions that must remain in balance in order to maintain health. A practitioner using this technique assesses factors such as skin color, vocal sound, body odor, emotional state, and pulse, using the information gathered to diagnose and treat the imbalance.
  • Inhalation (Acupuncture)
    Inhalation is a form of aromatherapy that's helpful in treating respiratory infection or congestion, in which essential oils are inhaled directly. Inhalation therapy can be used to relieve congestion due to colds, flu, or chronic sinus and bronchitis problems. Practitioners can add essential oils to boiling water so that patients can inhale the therapeutic steam, or they may place oils beneath the patient's nose so that he or she can inhale plant essences directly
  • Moxibustion (Acupuncture)
    Moxibustion is an analgesic technique in which moxa, a flammable substance derived from the leaves of wormwood plants, is ignited on the skin. The technique is intended to warm regions of the body, as well as stimulating blood circulation and energy toward acupuncture points. It is often used, but not exclusively, as a supplemental treatment to acupuncture.
  • Moxibustion (Acupuncture)
    Moxibustion is a form of heat therapy in which dried plant materials called moxa are burned on or very near the surface of the skin. The intention is to warm and invigorate the flow of Qi in the body and dispel certain pathogenic influences.
  • Myofascial Release (Acupuncture)
    Myofascial release is the three-dimensional application of sustained pressure and movement into the fascial system in order to eliminate fascial restrictions and facilitate the emergence of emotional patterns and belief systems that are no longer relevant or are impeding progress. First, an assessment is made by visually analyzing the human frame, followed by the palpation of the tissue texture of various fascial layers. Upon locating an area of fascial tension, gentle pressure is applied in the direction of the restriction. Myofascial release is an effective therapeutic approach in the relief of cervical pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, neurological dysfunction, restriction of motion, chronic pain, and headaches.
  • Reiki Healing (Acupuncture)
    In a reiki healing session, the practitioner, trained to access and serve as a channel for the life force (ki or chi), places her hands on or just above the client’s body in order to activate healing energy within receptive points on the body. The practitioner’s hands move progressively with a passive touch through twelve positions on the body, remaining in each position for three to five minutes. As a harmonic flow of energy is strengthened, within the client and practitioner, healing occurs through the return of physical, mental, and spiritual balance.
  • Traditional Chinese Acupuncture (Acupuncture)
    Traditional Chinese acupuncture is the form of acupuncture in which the plurality of practitioners are trained, and it remains the most widely practiced form. According to traditional Chinese medicine, the human body is filled with lines or channels through which the energy of the body flows. These channels function as points of entry into the body, called acupuncture points. Acupuncture is the practice of inserting fine sterile stainless steel needles into these points to remove blockages and imbalances in the body's energy flow. Removing these blockages allows energy and blood to circulate smoothly throughout the body, stimulating the body to heal itself.

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Version 1.0.2 (Morpheus-517) -- 30.November.2009